Ashridge Flora


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The extensive acreage and varying habitat at Ashridge support a wide variety of native spring flowers to delight the field naturalist – apart from the ubiquitous bluebell.

Rarities include the wild daffodil to be found at Webb’s Copse at Frithsden. A recent find in the area is a large clump of Monkshood, but this comes with a severe health warning being highly toxic. It may be a garden reject.

The wood at Aldbury Nowers on the other side of the Estate supports the rare white helleborine, along with a clump of Solomon’s Seal which may have been planted by an enthusiast.

The chalk downland is home to the declining Pasque flower, which appeared for the first time this year on Piccadilly Hill, since being planted out last year.

Written by  a Volunteer Ranger

This entry was posted in Flora and Fauna, Volunteer Rangers. Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Ashridge Flora

  1. poshjanet365gmailccom says:

    Have you found the wild narcissi in the back field at the Woodyard ? The clumps increase in size each year despite grazing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Visited the field behind Woodyard Cottage yesterday while the property is unoccupied awaiting refurbishment. The clumps of narcissus are extensive but cannot be identified until next spring! Lots of nice summer flowers including lesser stichwort and a bank of wild angelica.
      The bell on the roof of the cottage marks it out as a vernacular building – presumably rung for the benefit of the woodyard workers and foresters in the 1800’s. The building has some nice construction features and probably dates from around 1820 when John William the 7th Earl broke the rules by building it outside of his park on the common, and impeding travel on the old road from Hemel to Aldbury. Originally built as two semi-detached cottages, and extended over the two centuries.

      Like

  2. johntrimmerbtconnectcom says:

    Thanks for that Janet, I will take a look.

    Like

  3. Willow says:

    We’re so lucky to have such varied habitats at Ashridge. I too would be interested to hear about the flora in the field near Woodyard Cottage. I like the large fungi at the side of the former horse field at Woodyard too.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. johntrimmerbtconnectcom says:

    Watch this space!

    Like

    • Visited the field behind Woodyard Cottage yesterday while the property is unoccupied awaiting refurbishment. The clumps of narcissus are extensive but cannot be identified until next spring! Lots of nice summer flowers including lesser stichwort and a bank of wild angelica.
      The bell on the roof of the cottage marks it out as a vernacular building – presumably rung for the benefit of the woodyard workers and foresters in the 1800’s. The building has some nice construction features and probably dates from around 1820 when John William the 7th Earl broke the rules by building it outside of his park on the common, and impeding travel on the old road from Hemel to Aldbury. Originally built as two semi-detached cottages, and extended over the two centuries.

      Like

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